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No.103(2012/10/5)
2011 Survey of Employment Trends in Japan

The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare issued a report on its 2011 Survey of Employment Trends in Japan on September 12, 2012. This survey is conducted with the aim of investigating job finding and job separation conditions in workplaces in principal industries nationwide, as well as conditions by industry and occupation and the state of unfilled job offers in workplaces, thereby clarifying the actual situation relating to labour force turnover, unfilled job offers, and other employment factors.

Survey Results
The number of people who found jobs during 2011 was 6,300,000, and the number of people who left jobs during the year was 6,410,000. Thus, excluding the impact of the opening and closure of workplaces and so on, the number of people leaving jobs was 110,000 more than those finding jobs.

By type of employment, in the case of general workers, the number finding jobs (3,720,000) was 220,000 fewer than the number leaving jobs (3,940,000). In contrast, in the case of part-time workers, the number finding jobs (2,570,000) was 100,000 more than the number leaving jobs (2,470,000).

The job finding ratio (that is, the ratio of workers finding jobs during the year to the number of regular workers at the beginning of the year) was 14.2%, and the job separation ratio (the ratio of workers leaving jobs during the year to the number of regular workers at the beginning of the year) was 14.4%, both down by 0.1% from the previous year. As a result, the total labour force turnover ratio (the job finding ratio plus the job separation ratio) was 28.6%, the lowest level since comparable statistics became available in 2004.

Looking at the job separation ratio by reason why workers left their jobs, personal reasons, including marriage, childbirth and childcare, nursing care, and others, accounted for 9.8% of the total, followed by expiration of contract term (2.2%); company decision, including management conditions, transfer, and reinstatement in former workplace (1.2%); and mandatory retirement (0.8%).

Looking at labour force turnover by industry, the number of people finding jobs was highest in the wholesale and retail industries (1,070,000 workers), followed by the hotel and restaurant industries (1,020,000) and medical care and welfare (970,000). The number of people leaving jobs was highest in the wholesale and retail industries (1,090,000), followed by the hotel and restaurant industries (1,040,000) and medical care and welfare (860,000).

Of workers who changed jobs, 28.5% received higher wages in their new jobs than in their previous jobs, 32% received lower wages, and 38.1% got the same. Of those receiving higher wages, 17.9% got a wage increase of 10% or more. Of those receiving lower wages, 23.1% saw their wages drop by 10% or more. Year on year, the rates of those receiving higher wages and those receiving lower wages declined by 0.9 percentage points and 0.3 percentage points, respectively.

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